Enter, Bazili Wynohradnyk, Again

I just got back from the great So. Cal. Genealogy Jamboree put on by the So. Cal. Genealogy Society. The last lecture I attended was by the Uber knowledgeable Stephen Danko. He has the “gold standard” version of a genealogy weblog. It here. Be astounded. I always am.

Anyway, Steve’s talk was on immigration records. Basically the talk was about opening your eyes to more than what the date was that your ancestor arrived. Depending on the year, immigration records can contain some very interesting information.

In a previous post I said that my Grandfather came to the US from Canada in 1911. This is true, but it’s only  partially truth. After looking much harder at the 1911 immigration record, you can see that Granddad also said that he had entered the US in December of 1910. Guess what? I found that record.

So, here’s the full story. Bazili Wynohradnyk left Hamburg, Germany on the S.S. Pretoria on 23 November, 1910. He arrived at Ellis Island on 13 December 1910. At some point, he went to Canada and returned to the US from Canada, by train, in November 1911 headed for Boston.

S.S. Pretoria Manifest ( Two pages):

Pretoria Page 1
Pretoria Page 1

Page 2:

Pretoria page 2
Pretoria page 2

And as a special bonus, a picture of the S.S. Pretoria:

S.S. Pretoria
S.S. Pretoria

There’s a bunch more information on this manifest that I need to do a bit more research on:  Like just who is Maria Wynohradnyk ? It lists her as married and Bazili as single. It also lists Maria’s father as having the last name: Aufczak which, to me is pretty darn close to Ostafyczuk my grandmothers maiden name.

Did the Wynohradnyk’s and the Ostafyczuk’s know each other in Galacia?

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10 thoughts on “Enter, Bazili Wynohradnyk, Again

  1. Hi Stephen…I have been researching family from Sniatyn who came to Boston for several years now. In looking at the manifest that you posted I believe Maria Wynohradnyk’s father is Janio (Jan/John) Dutczak. Dutczak is a name that appears in the Sniatyn church records many times. I find it strange that she is listed as married, but gives the name of her father as closest relative in Sniatyn and the name of her sister as her contact in the US. Where does the husband come in?

    1. Maybe her husband came over first and is waiting for her? It does sound a little strange though. I’m glad I’m not the only one who gets confused by these things!

      Steve

  2. I had come across the record of marriage for Bazili Wynohradnyk and Anna Ostafyczuk while searching for some of my own family members. Bazili gives the names of his parents as Nikolas and Anna Charuk. In the Greek Orthodox church records for Sniatyn, Galicia held by the LDS there is a birth record for Basili Wynohradnyk on January 28, 1887. His parents are named Nicolaus Wynohradnyk and Catharine Charuk. I think there is a good chance that this is the same person.

    1. Hi Mark,

      Thanks for the info! Just yesterday I went to my local LDS and requested the Greek-Catholic birth records for Sniatyn. If you have any copies of the birth record on hand, I’d be very happy if you could e-mail me a copy.

      Steve

      1. I have been transcribing the church records from microfilm so I don’t have an actual copy to send you. When your microfilm arrives, I think you will be pleased to see how easy the records are to make out. Just to speed up your research, I can tell you that Nicolaus and Catharine had the following children, all born in Sniatyn:
        a)Alexi, b. Mar. 26, 1874
        b)Helena, b. Mar. 31, 1876, d. Apr. 13, 1881
        c)Michael, b. Nov. 19, 1878, d. Aug. 27, 1879
        d)Sophia, b. Sep. 26, 1880
        e)Maria, b. Mar. 15, 1883, d. Mar. 17, 1883
        f)Michael, b. Mar. 15, 1883, d. Mar. 17, 1883
        g)Maria, b. Apr. 8, 1884
        h)Basili, b. Jan. 28, 1887
        i)Demetri, b. Oct. 15, 1889

        I have only gotten up to 1891 with the birth records, so there may be more after Demetri. Its somewhat shocking how high the mortality rate was among infants and children. I also find it strange how often I come across families where younger children are given the same names as older ones who died.

        If you decide to order the marriage records at some point, you will find that Nicolaus Wynohradnyk and Catharine Charuk were married in Sniatyn on May 30, 1871. Nicolaus was born c1849, the son of Onuphri Wynohradnyk and Maria Iwasiuk. Catharine was born c1851, the daughter of Michael Charuk and Maria Bakun.

        If you decide to order the death records at some point, you will find that Nicolaus’ father Onuphri(son of Basile) was born c1818 and died on Oct. 8, 1879. Nicolaus’ mother Maria Iwasiuk was born c.1817 and died on Dec. 17, 1889.

        Onuphri and Maria Wynohradnyk had two other sons that I have come across in my research, Mathias and Simeon. Mathias was born c.1846 and married Rosalia Kotapski (my great-grandmother was a Kotapski) in Sniatyn on Aug. 1, 1869. Simeon was born c1857 and married Anna Wiszniowski on Oct. 28, 1883.

      2. Mark,

        All I can say is “WOW”. I will be ordering all the birth/death/marriage records at some point, but obviously, you’ve done some considerable work. I know my Grandfather had at least one brother “John” who immigrated to the US, specifically New York. I haven’t yet done much research on him as I wanted to find pretty much what you found first: his parents and the rest of his family.

        I’m slso hoping to find my grandmother’s records in the same film as she was from the same area.

        Thanks again for all this information!!!

        Steve

        Thank you very much for

  3. Stephen….I’m glad that you are going to request these films and look at the records yourself. Although I can assure you that this info is accurate, I want you to see it and source it for yourself. Any good genealogist knows the importance of verifying info found on the internet!

    1. I’m *real* excited. I’ve been putting off getting these records for a number of years because I’d thought they would be too hard to read. Now that you’ve seen them and said it would be “easy” ( we’ll see about that) to translate them I can hardly wait.

      I’ll also check out the census you mentioned. It’s around here somewhere.

      Thanks again!

      Steve

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